However, I agreed with almost all of it, and some of it was a relief to read - to see some things that had been niggling at me, now set out in black and white, with 'permission' to feel that's OK. Maybe it was more the examples than the messages that bothered me? The most insightful comments on all subjects Appiah takes time in the beginning of the book to illustrate how values and ways of living can differ, while people still share some foundational beliefs. 'active' : ''"> Cosmopolitanism: Ethics in a World of Strangers is a philosophical text by Princeton professor Kwame Anthony Appiah. In previous periods of absolutism and certainties, great minds arose to resist brute forces and propaganda. Published in 2006, the book details ideas about ethics that Appiah developed over years writing journal articles and giving lectures. The end is not relativism but collective values. This book, despite the interesting topic + scholar guiding it, bored me to rage. You can also choose to be emailed when someone replies Start your Independent Premium subscription today. I kind of was looking for more of a bite but I think it's a good book I'd want a lot of people to read. language is not acceptable, Do not impersonate other users or reveal private information about third parties, We reserve the right to delete inappropriate posts and ban offending users without notification, -1) ? Arguing that we concentrate too much on what makes us different rather than recognising our common humanity, … I don't have much to say about this book. Through anecdotes and thought experiments, Appiah develops the “caring and curiosity” stance. The right despises it because cosmopolitans make bad nationalists and patriots. 419-424. Call me a globalized liberal who thinks we can work most things out, but the fact that besides a bedrock belief in toleration of all but intolerance, there is little else that exists as a absolute in Appiah's thinking is attractive to me. Cosmopolitanism: Ethics in a World of Strangers by Kwame Anthony Appiah 196pp, Allen Lane, £16.99 Prehistoric hunter-gatherers encountered fewer people in a … 3.5 stars tbh. Sharing the full story, not just the headlines. It fell far from making a radical case for solidarity, or anything for that matter. This book would be good for generating a discussion about multiculturalism in a middle-school or high-school classroom. I've long liked to think of myself as a citizen of the world, as a cosmopolitan - so I was tad disappointed when bits of this book stuck in my craw. So, if we're all citizens of the cosmos -- or, to scale it back, the planet -- how should we interact with and treat each other? If the word conjures up images of chic city dwellers or the frou-frou drinks they possibly consume, rest assured: Appiah's using cosmopolitanism in the sense of the original root word: cosmos. Grapples with the issue that sometimes people are so different that what seems "normal" to them seems "downright immoral" to some others. Appiah goes further still: "...we have obligations to others, obligations that stretch beyond those to whom we are related by the ties of kith and kind." By not applying his brilliant mind to the most volatile situations, his mission loses heat and urgency. For example, illegally and legally obtained art currently held in European museums might often serve "humanity" better by remaining there, so long as it can be widely shared (i.e. Every once in a while it would start down an interesting path, but cut it off quickly with a homily. Appiah proposes cosmopolitanism as a solution. It's not that I necessarily disagree with the book's message. Refresh and try again. Be the first to ask a question about Cosmopolitanism. I didnt hate this as much as many of my classmates did. *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. I'm still compiling notes for an essay investigating the idea of "global citizenship", a prominent concept at the college where I teach and one that seems not nearly as much in harmony with the political climate of today (2018) as when this book was first published (2006), which also was more or less when our college first explicitly embraced the concept. I can't wrap my head around author's calling himself a cosmopolitan throughout the book and stating in various parts of the book that cosmopolitanism isn't about equal care for strangers. We'd better start with the recognition that they don't. Then how is it that this purported fog of epistemic uncertainty leaves any room for casuistry or ethics at all - for if ignorance of the full extent of the consequences of our actions is good enough reason to obviate an ethical duty, then NO action can be judged ethical because the full consequences of every single action can not be teased out. His examples and storytelling feel frequently like counterexamples as much as examples to make his points. try again, the name must be unique, Please Most liked. He confesses: "This book is not a contribution to the debates about the true face of globalisation. I don't have much to say about this book. 2007, in Cosmopolitanism: Ethics in a World of Strangers. How does one do the most good? Independent Premium. This last will appear to people who dislike Peter Singer's drowning. Guidelines. There's something really clever going on in Appiah's take on ethics in a global world. Cosmopolitanism: Ethics in a World of Strangers by Kwame Anthony Appiah Kwame Anthony Appiah’s landmark new work, featured on the cover of the New York Times Magazine , challenges the separatist doctrines espoused in books like Samuel Huntington’s THE CLASH OF CIVILIZATIONS. I have been aware of it for several years, have seen it referenced in various places and decided I should actually read the thing. Just don't feel that I learned anything new nor was I led to any new ways of looking at or thinking about anything. Oldest first, -1) ? He goes out of his way to point out that while the main thrust of his positive argument is "you care about X because your neighbour does" is easy to articulate, it's damn hard to get there in most ethical systems. Create a commenting name to join the debate. The existing Open Comments threads will continue to exist for those who do not subscribe to His extraordinary English mother married his Ghanaian Asante father, a barrister, later an elder in the Methodist church of Ghana where Apiah was raised: "In the final message my father left for me and my sisters, he wrote, 'Remember you are citizens of the world.'" Kwame Anthony Appiah is a philosopher who thinks about the ethical questions that accompany a cosmopolitan identity. Please I'm a philosopher by trade and philosophers rarely write useful books." Want to bookmark your favourite articles and stories to read or reference later? If someone really thinks that some group of people genuinely doesn’t matter at all, he will suppose they are outside the circle of those to whom justifications are due.”, Arthur Ross Book Award for Gold Medal (2007), Fundamental books to study history at university, interviewed on the Ezra Klein Show (podcast), Readers' Most Anticipated Books of December. 1. Cosmopolitanism: Ethics in a world of strangers. Saw lots of connections with All American Boys, Happiness, Go Went Gone, The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas...also The Good Place which is my new binge show. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. they can to create a true meeting of independent Premium. It celebrates the "contamination" of cosmopolitanism's curiousity and engagement with difference without critiquing seriously enough the uneven distributions of power that produce and map those differences. To do justice to future readers I should say that this book has very little to do with cosmopolitanism in spite of the author's insistence on calling it so. An inconsistent book that makes a case for living and let live in an increasingly cosmopolitan world. February 17th 2007 It celebrates the "contamination" of cosmopolitanism's curiousity and engagement with difference without critiquing seriously enough the uneven distributions of power that produce and map those differences. Start your Independent Premium subscription today. Appiah's naive thesis--never clearly articulated--appears to be that the world would be a better place, more "cosmopolitan"--in the paradoxical Greek sense of the word--if we only sought to share and understand each other better. Kwame Anthony Appiah takes up the challenge. Call me a globalized liberal who thinks we can work most things out, but the fact that besides a bedrock belief in toleration of all but intolerance, there is little else that exists as a absolute in Appiah's thinking is attractive to me. Kwame Anthony Appiah, the president of the PEN American Center, is the author of The Ethics of Identity, Thinking It Through: An Introduction to Contemporary Philosophy, The Honor Code and the prize-winning Cosmopolitanism. try again, the name must be unique, Please to your comment. It allows our most engaged readers to debate the big issues, share their own experiences, discuss fans of Tom Friedman, debunkers of Tom Friedman, Appiah writes elegantly about cosmopolitanism, lacing his narrative (employing "we" as in, "we cosmopolitans") with anecdotes, effectively referencing philosophers, authors, and the like. Are you sure you want to delete this comment? The curiosity tempers the extent to which caring might lead to a civilizing mission mindset, which might follow from caring combined with a lack of curiosity that comes when one thinks theyve got it. real-world solutions, and more. His objection to this argument? The civilized, they believed, had to learn to be citizens of the cosmos. Like millions of others, I yearn for the cessation of aggressive binary discourse and spiralling wars that have all but killed the buoyancy of the new millennium. I had a chance to hear him speak last semester, and I recommend it to anyone who has the time. try again, the name must be unique, Please I have to say I find Appiahs cosmopolitanism to be incredibly appealing. ", Kwame Anthony Appiah, the president of the PEN American Center, is the author of, “I am urging that we should learn about people in other places, take an interest in their civilizations, their arguments, their errors, their achievements, not because that will bring us to agreement, but because it will help us get used to one another.”, “Once you start offering reasons for ignoring the interests of others, however, reasoning itself will usually draw you into a kind of universality. We can't know all of the consequences of our actions, so we can't say. I loved reading this and applying Appiah's understandings of cosmopolitanism to Moby Dick, which was why we had to read this text. Drawing on a broad range of disciplines, including history, literature, and philosophyas well as the author's own experience of life on three continents, Drawing on a broad range of disciplines, including history, literature, and philosophy—as well as the author's own experience of life on three continents—. Please This volume ends up being a nice book for good people. We are presented with caricatures of anti-globalists, postmodern relativists and people who want to preserve some kind of cultural authenticity, their arguments being presented in an overly simplistic fashion so that Appiah can easily wave them away. He is confident of the ability of local identities to take care of themselves against the forces of cultural homogenisation, apparently sanguine of the devastating inequities of cultural power. Hare's suggestion of adopting general rules of thumb for ethical behavior, since neither can we know the full consequences of our actions nor do we have the time to examine the consequences of every trivial decision we make in a robust way. Read "Cosmopolitanism: Ethics in a World of Strangers (Issues of Our Time)" by Kwame Anthony Appiah available from Rakuten Kobo. It has a long and distinguished history as a search for an ideal beyond the nation or the city. But a savant he is not, not in this book at least. Then there is Bernard Williams who contends that utilitarianism demands too much of us, and that we should devote time and money to personal projects that we find meaningful. Anyway! Find books like Cosmopolitanism: Ethics in a World of Strangers from the world’s largest community of readers. 'active' : ''"> Anthony Appiah’s belief in having conversations across boundaries, and in recognizing our obligations to other human beings, offers a welcome prescription for a world … Newest first, -1) ? ", Yasmin Alibhai-Brown's latest book, 'Some of My Best Friends Are...', is published by Politico's, The best in film, music, TV & radio straight to your inbox, Register with your social account or click here to log in. The Effects Of Globalization In Kwame Anthony Appiah's Cosmopolitanism. This is not to say, however, that the search for universals, or for ideals is a useless pursuit, only that the motivations, rationalizations and deployment of universals must be examined carefully. Cosmopolitanism: Ethics in a World of Strangers (Issues of Our Time) [Appiah, Kwame Anthony] on Amazon.com. Through anecdote and principled argumentation, Appiah tries to find an ethical terrain that allows for the flourishing of both, a cosmopolitanism in which individuals can give expression to a multiplicity of identities and loyalties while building an enlightened global community … ... Summary: In this chapter, Appiah offers a cosmopolitan critique of the concept of cultural property/patrimony. Appiah writes elegantly about cosmopolitanism, lacing his narrative (employing "we" as in, "we cosmopolitans") with anecdotes, effectively referencing philosophers, authors, and the like. An intelligent though not perfect exploration of what it means to live in a globalised world. It was pretty interesting. A reason is an offer of a ground for thinking or feeling or doing something. We can't know all of the consequences of our actions, so we can't say that the sort of austere altruism drawn out from the Shallow Pond is the ethical thing to do. They rejected parochial or country loyalties for a greater good. 'active' : ''"> Very readable account of Appiah's own experiences of cosmopolitanism linked to theory. Saw lots of connections with All American Boys, Happiness, Go Went Gone, The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas...also The Good Place which is my new binge show. Are you sure you want to mark this comment as inappropriate? There have 1 Appiah, Kwame Anthony, Cosmopolitanism: Ethics in a World of Strangers,(2006), WW Norton: NY, pp.xii-xiii 2 Ibid, p. xv Nonetheless, alongside Amartya Sen's book from the same series, An intelligent though not perfect exploration of what it means to live in a globalised world. In Kwame Anthony Appiah’s book Cosmopolitanism: Ethics in a World of Strangers, he begins his chapter on globalization with the statement “people who complain about the homogeneity produced by globalization often fail to notice that globalization is, equally, a threat to homogeneity” (101). Where are the sages when you need them? Reading this book today, then, seems a bit anachronistic, but I still find Appiah's arguments as appealing as ever--and probably more necessary than ever. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more. Hitler and Stalin launched regular invectives against "rootless cosmopolitans". He evaluates the values inherent in language itself. For instance, this is from almost the end of the book: "to say that we have obligations to strangers isn't to demand that they have the same grip on our sympathies as our nearest and dearest. It's not that I necessarily disagree with the book's message, though I do take issue with some of his positions, e.g. Cosmopolitanism: Ethics in a World of Strangers (Issues of Our Time) And that's the pity of it all. The solutions he proposes are based on an optimism that I am not sure I share. But I digress. Cosmopolitanism is the idea that we have moral duties to all persons, even … Plus, to be a “citizen of the world” comes with its own set of obligations to “the world,” right? Turned out to be a bit of a disappointment. Taken as separate set pieces, I would rate most of this book's chapters as worthy of five stars. Reading Kwame Appiahs Cosmopolitanism Review ECI 524 By Yuanyuan Fang By integrating illustrative storytelling with inspirational philosophical theories, Kwame Anthony Appiah in Cosmopolitanism: Ethics in a World of Strangers presents a significant and humane philosophy as an art of living in this confused age and delivers a moral manifesto of being a citizen of the world in a planet … The recent public expression of interest in cosmopolitanism is just the latest expression in the history of the concept. St Paul, Kant, Voltaire cherished commonalities between humans. It reassesses the case for reviving an ancient stream of thought in a world full of strangers, and finds that Cosmopolitanism is a universal trait of humankind. Appiah's naive thesis--never clearly articulated--appears to be that the world would be a better place, more "cosmopolitan"--in the paradoxical Greek sense of the word--if we only sought to share and understand each other better. I have been aware of it for several years, have seen it referenced in various places and decided I should actually read the thing. Appiah revives the ancient philosophy of Cosmopolitanism, which dates back to the Cynics of the 4th century, as a means of understanding the complex world of today. Find your bookmarks in your Independent Premium section, under my profile, There are no comments yet - be the first to add your thoughts, There are no Independent Premium comments yet - be the first to add your thoughts, Cosmopolitanism: Ethics in a World of Strangers, By Kwame Anthony Appiah, Email already exists. Appiah was raised in Ghana but educated at Cambridge. The book is insidious, however...too easy in its conclusions. Cosmopolitanism: ethics in a world of strangers 2006, W.W. Norton in English - 1st ed. (2009). He elegantly turns away from the implications of his advocacy, in particular for the US. Hardcover, 196 ... close overlay Buy Featured Book Title Cosmopolitanism Subtitle Ethics in a World of Strangers … Table of Contents. As a collective whole, I think the chapters are just fragmented enough to drag the book overall into the four-star category. As Marx said: "The philosophers have only interpreted the world, in various ways; the point, however, is to change it. “At its core, Cosmopolitanism is a reasoned appeal for mutual respect and understanding among the world’s people. You might not require more era to spend to go to the book start as without difficulty as search for them. I can't wrap my head around author's calling himself a cosmopolitan throughout the book and stating in various parts of, To do justice to future readers I should say that this book has very little to do with cosmopolitanism in spite of the author's insistence on calling it so. As a student of philosophy, and as a person genuinely interested in the type of project that Appiah pursues herein, I became increasingly frustrated with his work here. Welcome back. ... a very thoughtful, at times critical, but affirming look at ethics from the perspective of those of us (myself included) who put at least as much value in being a citizen of the world as that of any one country, who see difference in peoples and cultures more as an opportunity for learning more about the human condition as an amalgamate of _all_ human experience, rather than a reason to wall off from one another. This landmark work challenges the separatist doctrines which have come to dominate our understanding of the world. K. A. Appiah is himself a citizen of the world: a professor of philosophy at Princeton, with a Ghanian father and an English mother, he was raised in Ghana and educated in Web, itinerant exhibitions). Borrow Listen. How come there is no substantial analysis of Israel's increasingly obdurate Zionism? I read this book as an introduction to the complexities of living respectfully and humanely in a world where people do not all value the same things or organize their lives the same way. I think he misses the point re cultural property rights and why they are important. To acquire this empathy we must engage in vigorous conversation. Reading this book today, then, seems a bit anachronistic, but I still find Appiah's arguments as appealing as ever--and probably more. He agrees that the biggest colonizers (British) in history should maintain the repository of the heritage of the world in the British Museum. Our journalists will try to respond by joining the threads when Somewhat too popular science-y for what I was looking for (academic background text) but definitely worthwhile if you come at it from a general reader perspective. It felt like a book that just glanced around on the surface of the author's "we are one world under it all" philosophy. Moreover, there is little if any acknowledgement of what critics like Tim Brennan argue vehemently...that cosmopolitanism, like globalization and neoliberalism, are universals with origins in the West--their dissemination serves the interest of not all, but some. Applying principal component factor analysis to various items in the 2005/6 World Values Study, we find two different kinds of trust which we term “primordial” and “cosmopolitan”. Newest first, -1) ? The book, Cosmopolitanism: Ethics in a World of Strangers, is a clear and well-written book which is enjoyable to read.